Saturday, December 31, 2011

New Years Is Almost Here



This is a picture our family dog Shelby...sitting near the fire, waiting. Shelby waits, not knowing what she is waiting for. Every day is the same. This should not be for you and me. Every day should have meaning and reason.

Soon is will be a new year. 2012. Can you believe it? I remember Orwell's book 1984. 1984 was well into the future..now it is so far behind us. Time is passing by.

So what should my New Years resolution be?

To love God and my neighbor. Only with more heart, doing all in Jesus' Name. That is my every day resolution, and my New Year resolution.

Friday, December 30, 2011

A Future and a Hope


Jeremiah 29:11

"For I know the plans I have for you," says the LORD. "They are plans for good and not for disaster, to give you a future and a hope.
(NLT)



Image ©bjm 2011

Sunday, December 25, 2011

Merry Christmas !


Merry Christmas !


Pope Benedict's URBI ET ORBI message HERE

Painting by Norman Rockwell

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

St. Dominic of Silos



ST DOMINIC OF SILOS

Feast: December 20

St. Dominic, founder of the Order of Preachers, was named after this Benedictine abbot, who lived a century before him. According to Dominican tradition, St. Dominic of Silos appeared to Blessed Joan of Aza (the mother of the later St. Dominic), who made a pilgrimage to his shrine before the birth of her son, and named him after the abbot of Silos.

Dominic of Silos was born in Navarre, Spain, on the Spanish side of the Pyrenees, and was a shepherd boy, looking after his father's flocks. He acquired a love of solitude and as a young man became a monk at the monastery of San Millan de la Cogolla. He eventually became prior of the monastery and came into conflict with the king of Navarre over possessions of the monastery claimed by the king. The king drove Dominic out of the monastery, and Dominic went with other monks to Castille, where the king of Castille appointed Dominic abbot of the monastery of St. Sebastian at Silos.


The monastery was in terrible shape, spiritually and materially, and Dominic set about to restore the monastery and to reform the lives of the monks. He preserved the Mozarbic Rite (one of the variants of the Latin Rite) at his monastery, and his monastery became one of the centers of the Mozarbic liturgy. His monastery also preserved the Visigothic script of ancient Spain and was a center of learning and liturgy in that part of Spain.

Dominic of Silos died on December 20,1073, about a century before the birth of his namesake, St. Dominic of Calaruega. Before the Spanish Revolution of 1931, it was customary for the abbot of Silos to bring the staff of Dominic of Silos to the Spanish royal palace whenever the queen was in labor and to leave it at her bedside until the birth of her child had taken place.

In recent times, great interest in Dominic of Silos has arisen since the literary treasures of the library of Silos have become known. The abbey had a profound influence on spirituality and learning in Spain. Today the monastery is an abbey of the Benedictine Congregation of Solesmes housing a library of ancient and rare manuscripts.

Thought for the Day: St. Dominic of Silos came to know God in the solitude of a shepherd boy. It was this love of solitude that drew him into monastic life where he could be alone with his God. Most of us are so busy we scarcely have time for Sunday Mass. We should cultivate a little solitude, too.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Catholic League president Bill Donohue comments on abortion



Bill Donohue of the "Catholic League" comments...

On Tuesday evening, a New York City superintendent was gathering the garbage when he felt something strange. It was a baby. “When I found the baby,” he said, “I didn’t know if it was real at first. It was so bad.” Not surprisingly, it made him sick. “After what happened, I just stayed in my apartment for a while because I didn’t feel well.”

Two days later, a 20-year-old woman was arrested and charged with self-abortion in the first degree, a misdemeanor.

Andrea Miller of NARAL Pro-Choice was outraged. “They have taken what should be a medical and public health matter and turned it into a criminal case,” she said. Sonia Ossoria of the National Organization for Women agrees, saying, “it’s absolutely outlandish to charge her with self-abortion.”

So a woman kills her own baby, and the sole source of anger coming from the pro-abortion community is that she is being prosecuted. Not a word of sorrow about the dead baby.

In a perverse way, they may have a point: why is it criminally wrong to perform the exact same procedure that a well-paid doctor can do legally? If she is a monster, what does that make him? Moreover, had this same superintendent found a baby in the dumpster who had been dropped there by a Planned Parenthood worker, there would have been no prosecution.

Those running for president should be asked about this issue. Their answers would no doubt prove to be revealing.

Friday, December 2, 2011